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 International Flags and Pennants Word File (printable)

International Flags and Pennants

Alfa
A
Have diver down, keep clear
Kilo
K
Wish to communicate
Uniform
U
You are running into danger
1
1
 
Bravo
B
Dangerous goods
Lima
L
Stop instantly
Victor
V
Require assistance
2
2
 
Charlie
C
Yes
Mike
M
My vessel is stopped, making no way
Whiskey
W
Require medical assistance
3
3
 
Delta
D
Keep clear, maneuvering with difficulty
November
N
No
Xray
X
Stop your intentions, watch for signals
4
4
 
Echo
E
Altering course to starboard
Oscar
O
Man overboard
Yankee
Y
Dragging my anchor
5
5
 
Foxtrot
F
Disabled, communicate with me
Papa
P
HARBOR: All persons report on board
FISHING: Nets on obstruction
Zulu
Z
Require a tug
FISHING: Shooting nets
6
6
 
Golf
G
Require a pilot FISHING: Hauling nets
Quebec
Q
Request free pratigue
(1st Substitute)
S1
7
7
 
Hotel
H
Pilot on board
Romeo
R
(Procedure Signal) Received
(2nd Substitute)
S2
8
8
 
India
I
Altering course to port
Sierra
S
Engines going astern
(3rd Substitute)
S3
9
9
 
Juliett
J
On fire, have dangerous cargo, keep clear
Tango
T
Keep clear, engaged in pair trawling
(CODE)
CODE (Answering point or decimal)
0
0
 

Any extensive use of the International Code flags will call for the use of International Code of Signals, published by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office. A few of the principal signals and the general method of making and answering signals are given here.

HOW TO MAKE A SIGNAL. If you want to make a signal, hoist your ensign with the code flag under it. If more than one vessel or signal station is in sight and your signal is intended for a particular vessel or signal station, indicate which vessel or signal station you are addressing by making the distinguishing signal (i.e., the signal letters) of the vessel or station with which you want to communicate. If you don't know the distinguishing signal, observe that ships will answer with their distinguishing signal hoists or answering pennant.

When you have been answered by the vessel you are addressing, proceed with your signal, first hauling down your code flag. It may be required for making or answering signals.

Signals should always be hoisted where they can be best seen, not necessarily at the masthead. Each hoist should be kept flying until the other ship hoists her answering pennant close up. When finished signaling, haul down your ensign.

HOW TO ANSWER A SIGNAL. On seeing a signal made by another ship, hoist your answering pennant at the dip. (A flag is at the dip when it is hoisted about three-quarters up its halyard.)

Always hoist the answering pennant where it can be seen best.

When the hoist has been recognized and is understood, hoist your answering pennant close up, and keep it there until the other ship hauls her hoist down. Then haul your answering pennant down to the dip and wait for the next hoist.

If the other ship's flags cannot be made out or the signal is not understood, keep your answering pennant at the dip, and make a signal to that effect. When she has repeated or clarified her signal, hoist your answering pennant close up.